Organic peroxides possess one or more oxygen–oxygen bonds, which decompose thermally to produce two radicals. The rates of decompositions can be enhanced by specific promoters or activators being mostly multivalent metals such as iron, cobalt or vanadium.

They significantly decrease the energy necessary to break the oxygen–oxygen bond. Such accelerated decompositions occur below the normal application temperatures of the peroxides usually resulting in generation of only one useful radical, instead of two.

Enox 101 (DHBP) CAS Number: 78-63-7
2,5-Dimethyl-2,5-di(tert-butylperoxy)hexane
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Enox 101-50D-pd CAS Number: 78-67-3
2-5-Dimethyl-2-5-di-tert-butylperoxy-hexane on 50% silica
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Enox BPO CAS Number: 94-36-0
Dibenzoyl Peroxide
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Enox BPO-50FM CAS Number: 94-36-0
Dibenzoyl Peroxide in 50% dicyclohexyl phthalate
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Enox CH CAS Number: 3006-86-8
1,1-Di(tert-butylperoxy)cyclohexane
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Enox CH-80 CAS Number: 3006-86-8
(1,1-Di(tert-butylperoxy)cyclohexane
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Enox DCBP CAS Number: 133-14-2
Bis (2,4-Dichloro Benzoyl) Peroxide
Enox DTBP CAS Number: 110-05-4
Di-tert-butyl peroxide
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Enox PMBP CAS Number: 895-85-2
Di(4-methylbenzoyl)peroxide
Enox TBPB CAS Number: 614-45-9
tert-Butyl Peroxybenzoate
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